Prosody Definitions (Rhyme, Meter, Metrical Foot/Rhythm)

eye rhyme
A similarity between words in spelling but not pronunciation

feminine rhyme (double rhyme)
A rhyme between stressed syllables followed by one or more unstressed syllables

masculine rhyme
A rhyme of final stressed syllables

internal rhyme
A rhyme involving a word in the middle of a line and another at the end of the line or in the middle of the next line

rhyme scheme
The ordered pattern of rhymes at the ends of the lines of a poem or verse

monometer
a line of verse consisting of one metrical foot

Dimeter
Dimeter

Trimeter
A line of verse consisting of three metrical feet

Tetrameter
contains four iambs in each line

Pentameter
contains five iambs in each line

Hexameter
a line of verse consisting of six metrical feet

Heptameter
a line of verse consisting of seven metrical feet

Octameter
a line of verse consisting of eight metrical feet

Iamb (iambic)
a metrical foot consisting of one short(unstressed) syllable followed by one long(stressed) syllable

Trochee (trochaic)
a foot consisting of one long or stressed syllable followed by one short or unstressed syllable..

Pyrrhus (pyrrhic)
A metrical foot of two short or unaccented syllables

Dactyl (dactylic)
a metrical foot consisting of one stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables or (in Greek and Latin) one long syllable followed by two short syllables.

Anapest (anapestic)
a metrical foot consisting of two short or unstressed syllables followed by one long or stressed syllable.

Spondee (spondaic)
a foot consisting of two long (or stressed) syllables.

Scansion
to divide the poetry or a poetic form into feet by pointing out different syllables based on their lengths

Elision
The removal of an unstressed syllable, consonants, or letters from a word or phrase to decrease the number of letters or syllables in order to mix words together and replaced with an apostrophe

Syneresis
the contraction of two vowels into a diphthong or single vowel

Syncope
The contraction or the shortening of a word by omitting sounds, syllables or letters from the middle of the word

Acephalous
lacking a syllable or syllables in the first foot; does not have a head

Caesura
pauses come from natural rhythm of your speech.

End-stopped
a pause comes at the end of a sentence, clause or phrase; this pause can be expressed in writing as a punctuation mark such as a colon, semi-colon, period or full stop.

Enjambment
moving over from one line to another without a terminating punctuation mark.A phrase or clause in a line of poetry that does not come to an end at the line break but moves over to the next line.

Ellipsis
used in narratives to omit some parts of a sentence or event to give the reader a chance to fill the gaps

Repetition
repeats the same words or phrases a few times to make an idea clearer.

Aposiopesis
The speaker or writer breaks off abruptly and leaves the statement incomplete

Parallelism
a sentence that are grammatically the same; or similar in their construction, sound, meaning

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