Poetry Unit – English II – ALL

austere
forbiddingly stern; ascetic; without comfort or enjoyment; severely simple and unornamented; Ex. a monk’s _____ life

indifferently
having no particular interest or concern; apathetic: indifferent to the sufferings of others

chronic
constant; lasting a long time; inveterate

line
word or words in a row of poetry that may or may not make a complete sentence

stanza
group of consecutive lines in a poem that form a single unit; a division of a poem that is often referred to as a “paragraph of poetry”

couplet
two consecutive lines of poetry that rhyme

quatrain
stanza or group of four lines of poetry

sestet
a rhythmic group of six lines of verse

octave
a rhythmic group of eight lines of verse

prose
ordinary writing as distinguished from verse

enjambment
the continuation of thought or meaning, without pause or break, from one line of poetry to the next

Shakespearean or English sonnet
poem containing three quatrains and a concluding couplet; with a rhyme scheme of abab cdcd efef gg; written in iambic pentameter (5, two-syllable feet = 10 syllables)

submerged
hidden, covered; underwater (can be a noun or verb)

bureau
chest of drawers for clothing, etc.; a government department

melancholy
sad, gloomy, unhappy; sadness, gloominess

grimace
to make a face expressing feelings of pain, disgust, or contempt

fissure
narrow, slit-like opening or crack

end rhyme
rhyme that occurs at the end of two or more lines of poetry

rhyme scheme
the pattern of end rhymes in a poem

reaper
a person or machine that cuts grain for harvesting

scythe
a long curved blade for mowing, reaping, etc.

hone
(N.) a whetstone made of fine gritstone. (V.) to sharpen; make more effective

meter
a pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables (“beats”) that give a line of poetry a predictable rhythm — it’s how we “measure” poetry

rhythm
this gives poetry a musical quality, adds emphasis to certain words, and helps reinforce meaning.

foot
the basic unit of meter (like a “measure” in music) containing at one or more stressed syllables and/or one or more unstressed syllables

iamb
a metrical foot in poetry that has an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable, as in the word “protect” (pro-TECT)

pentameter
a line of verse consisting of five metrical feet

iambic pentameter
ten-syllable line in which every second syllable is stressed (“so long lives this and this gives life to thee”)

ABAB CDCD EFEF GG
rhyme scheme for a Shakespearean sonnet

temperate
calm and free from extremes of temperature

complexion
the appearance and condition of the skin of the face

free verse
poetry without a regular pattern of meter or rhyme

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